A Trip to Old Tokyo

A Trip to Old Tokyo

Discover the Japanese history and culture!

Tokyo Sensoji TempleTokyo is one of the most modern and high-tech cities in the world. The capital of Japan is known for its cutting edge technologies, advanced design and futuristic architectures. This modern megacity has a glorious past that defined the Japanese tradition and culture. The Edo period (1603-1867) was a period of economic growth, internal peace, stable population, strict social order and political stability under the military rule of “Tokugawa shogunate”. As the final period of traditional Japan it marked the beginning of the early modern period. Travelling to Tokyo you will have the chance to explore this glorious era and take a fascinating trip into Japanese history. For a taste of Edo-era Tokyo, visit the following attractions:

  • Edo-Tokyo Museum: Housed in an elevated-floor type warehouse, the museum offers an amazing journey through the 400 year history of Edo period. Permanent exhibitions, workshops, lectures and special events will help you to understand the history and culture of Edo-Tokyo and explore the city’s evolution from a humble fishing village to the megacity it is today. Address: 1-4-1 Yokoami, Sumida-ku, Tokyo 130-0015
  • Sensoji: The oldest temple in Tokyo was founded in 645 AD but it was rebuilt many times over the next 1.300 years. It is located in the heart of shitimachi, the areas where people of Edo period lived. Also known as the Asakusa Kannon Temple, it is the absolute must-see during your trip to Tokyo! Pass the Kaminarimon Gate and walk down the Nakamise-dori, the long shopping street that is lined with small souvenir shops and leads to the temple. The temple’s main gate is Hozomon and the main hall is Hondo, dedicated to the Buddhist God Kannon Bosatsu. Go up the stairs and see the amazing artworks of the ceiling. Leaving Hondo don’t miss the Shinto shrine Asakusa Jinja, the Yogodo with the city’s oldest stone bridge, the Hashimoto Yakushido and the spiritual branch Awashimado, all built in the Edo period. Some other highlights are the Nitenmon Gate, the Bentenyama bell tower, the five-story Pagoda and the residence of the head priest of Sensoji Temple, Dempo-in. Address: 2 Chome-3-1 Asakusa, Taito, Tokyo 111-0032
  • Tokyo Imperial Palace Seimon Ishibashi bridgeOnce you booked your cheap flights to Tokyo, plan your trip wisely and do not miss to see its beautiful Edo period gardens: The Hama Rikyū Garden is a public park in Chūō that was once used as a falconry site for Shogun families. Take the public water bus and get there by Sumida River! Address: 1-1 Hamarikyuteien, Chuo, Tokyo 104-0046. The Imperial Palace East Garden is a Japanese-style garden in the former site of Edo Castle. Part of the palace area, the gardens are open to the public, offering close up views to the castle’s walls and ruins. Address: 1-1 Chiyoda, Tokyo 100-8111. The Rikugien Garden is an early 18th century garden, built for the fifth Tokugawa Shogun. Its name means “Garden of the Six Principles of Poetry” and is one of the most beautiful garden in Tokyo, ideal for long walks. Address: 6-16-3 Honkomagome, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo
  • If you have several days left in your trip to Tokyo, take the train from Ikebukuro Station and visit Kawagoe. This Japanese city northwest of Tokyo is an Edo-period castle town. Known as “Little Edo”, it features many attractions including the bell tower Toki no kane, the candy street Kashiya Yokochō, the Kawagoe Kurazukuri Museum, the Kita-in Buddist Temple, the Naritasan Kawagoe Betsuin Temple and Honmaru Goten, the only surviving building of the former Kawagoe Castle.